Insurer uses Big Data to ‘fill gaps’ in health care

A San Francisco health insurance start-up has embraced Big Data in order to ‘fill gaps’ in patient care and improve clinical outcomes for senior citizens.

A San Francisco health insurance start-up has embraced Big Data in order to ‘fill gaps’ in patient care and improve clinical outcomes for senior citizens.

Clover Health is using the technology to track patients’ medical history and previous insurance claims so it can identify patients in need of greater help.

Clover is collecting data from doctor’s visits, cardiologist appointments and hospital sessions, and bringing that information together lab test and radiology results to get an accurate and in-depth picture of their customers’ health.

Using software models to identify issues, such as patients not taking their prescriptions, Clover allows nurse practitioners and social workers to intervene to prevent in-patient hospital admissions.

Kris Gale, CTO at Clover Health, said: “At the core we’re using data and software to build clinical profiles of people, identify gaps in care, and fill those gaps in care.”

Clover recently secured a $100 million investment, and the company claims a willingness for investors to back its proposition is down to the positioning of technology at the core of the business.

Clover will receive patients’ health insurance premiums from the US government through Medicare, with the business receiving more money for sicker patients than healthier patients.